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Breast cancer diagnosis in Inner-City African American and Hispanic women: The importance of early screening

  • Zi Zhang
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: 5501 Old York Road, Philadelphia, PA 19141, United States of America.
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiology, Einstein Healthcare Network/Jefferson Health, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America
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  • Ramya Rao
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiology, Harlem Hospital Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States of America
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  • Adil Omer
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiology, Harlem Hospital Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States of America
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 VLM was funded in part by the NIH/NCI Cancer Center Support Grant P30 CA008748. VLM reports funding from Pfizer for an unrelated study and is a consultant for Bayer Healthcare.
    Victoria L. Mango
    Footnotes
    1 VLM was funded in part by the NIH/NCI Cancer Center Support Grant P30 CA008748. VLM reports funding from Pfizer for an unrelated study and is a consultant for Bayer Healthcare.
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, United States of America
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  • Priscilla Wilson-Gardner
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiology, Harlem Hospital Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States of America
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  • Oreoluwa Ojutiku
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiology, Harlem Hospital Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States of America
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 VLM was funded in part by the NIH/NCI Cancer Center Support Grant P30 CA008748. VLM reports funding from Pfizer for an unrelated study and is a consultant for Bayer Healthcare.
Published:September 24, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinimag.2022.09.006

      Highlights

      • African-Americans and Hispanics diagnosed with breast cancer under 50 were likely to present with palpable concern and have no prior screening.
      • These young minority women diagnosed with breast cancer were also likely to have invasive and triple negative cancer.
      • Our study highlights the importance of screening mammography in young African-American and Hispanic women who tend to have aggressive cancer.
      • Our data support ACR/SBI recommendations that African-American may be at high-risk for breast cancer and should be evaluated for risk by age 30.

      Abstract

      Purpose

      To evaluate the diagnosis of breast cancer in inner-city African-American and Hispanic women under age 50 to support the importance of screening in this population.

      Methods

      This retrospective chart review included women newly diagnosed with breast cancer from 1/1/2015 to 1/1/2019 in a city hospital mainly serving minority patients. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used for analysis.

      Results

      In this cohort of 108 newly diagnosed African-American (63%) and Hispanic (31%) women, 60/108 (56%) presented with a site of palpable concern for diagnostic workup, and the remaining were diagnosed via asymptomatic screening. Women ages 30–49 were significantly more likely to present with a site of palpable concern when compared to women ages 50–69 (68% vs. 44%, p = 0.045). Additionally, women ages 30–49 were more likely to have triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) than women ages 50–69 (20% vs. 10%, p = 0.222). However, women ages 30–49 were less likely to have prior mammogram than women ages 50–69 (24% vs. 46%, p = 0.062).

      Conclusion

      African-American and Hispanic women ages 30–49 were more likely to present with a site of palpable concern and TNBC than those ages 50–69. However, these young minority women ages 30–49 were less likely to have prior screening mammograms when compared to those ages 50–69. Our data highlights the importance of starting screening mammography no later than age 40 in African-American and Hispanic women. In addition, these women should have risk assessment for breast cancer no later than age 30 and be screened appropriately.

      Keywords

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