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Assessment of cervical spinal cord volume in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis

  • Saher Suleman
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurology, Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, United States of America
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  • Matthew Harwood
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiology, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, United States of America
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  • Paul Kang
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurology, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, United States of America
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  • Ram Narayan
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: c/o Neuroscience Publications, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix, AZ 85013, United States of America.
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurology, Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, United States of America

    Department of Neurology, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, United States of America
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  • Jeremy N. Hughes
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurology, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, United States of America
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      Highlights

      • Spinal cord volume did not differ significantly between POMS patients and controls.
      • Estimated spinal cord volumes were lower in POMS patients with C2 lesions than controls in this small cohort.
      • Spinal cord average segmental area was lower in POMS patients with C2 lesions than controls in this small cohort.

      Abstract

      Purpose

      Several studies of adult-onset multiple sclerosis (AOMS) patients have demonstrated that spinal cord volume loss is associated with disease progression and clinical disability. However, complementary studies of young patients with pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (POMS) are lacking. Our retrospective study aimed to assess spinal cord volume in POMS patients compared with that in healthy controls.

      Methods

      Cervical spinal cord magnetic resonance images were evaluated for 20 POMS patients and 20 age- and sex-matched controls. Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) were measured at C2 and C7, along with the spinal cord average segmental area (CASA). The POMS group was further subdivided based on the presence or absence of spinal cord lesions, specifically C2 lesions. Pairwise area and volume comparisons were made across the different groups.

      Results

      No significant difference was found in CASA and CSA at C2 and C7 between POMS patients and comparative controls. However, CASA, CSA at C7, and estimated spinal cord volume were significantly lower in a small subset of POMS patients with C2 lesions (3 patients) than in controls (P = 0.001, 0.02, and 0.001, respectively).

      Conclusion

      No significant difference was found in spinal cord areas and volumes between POMS patients and controls. This finding contrasts with spinal cord volume measurements in AOMS patients.

      Abbreviations:

      AOMS (adult-onset multiple sclerosis), BMI (body mass index), BSA (body surface area), CASA (spinal cord average segmental area), CSA (cross-sectional area), EMR (electronic medical record), HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996), IRB (institutional review board), IQR (interquartile range), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), MS (multiple sclerosis), POMS (pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis), SD (standard deviation)

      Keywords

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