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Intraprocedural uterine position reorientation during uterine fibroid embolization: a case report

      Highlights

      • Importance of understanding anatomy for uterine fibroid embolization (UFE).
      • Uterus positioning is variable and can be altered in several clinical circumstances.
      • Intraprocedural uterine reorientation as a clinical entity.

      Abstract

      Uterine Fibroid Embolization is an effective method of treating uterine fibroids as an alternative to surgery. Positional changes of the uterus secondary to pregnancy, pelvic surgery, urinary retention, endometriosis and fibroids have all been reported, however, no literature has specifically described the uterus incidentally changing position during uterine fibroid embolization. We present a unique case of uterine reorientation during a uterine fibroid embolization procedure.

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