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Imaging prevalence of nasal septal perforation in an urban population

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical Center.
    Menachem Gold
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author.
    Footnotes
    1 Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical Center.
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiology, Lincoln Medical Center, 234 E. 149th St, Bronx, NY 10451, United States
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  • Issac Boyack
    Affiliations
    Dept of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11219, United States
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  • Author Footnotes
    2 Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Weill Medical College.
    Nicholas Caputo
    Footnotes
    2 Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Weill Medical College.
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Lincoln Medical Center, 234 E. 149th St, Bronx, NY 10451, United States
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  • Author Footnotes
    3 Associate Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology, Weill Cornell Medical Center.
    Aaron Pearlman
    Footnotes
    3 Associate Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology, Weill Cornell Medical Center.
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Lincoln Medical Center, 234 E. 149th St, Bronx, NY 10451, United States
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical Center.
    2 Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Weill Medical College.
    3 Associate Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology, Weill Cornell Medical Center.
Published:February 18, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinimag.2017.02.002

      Highlights

      • Nasal septal perforation prevalence on imaging in an urban population was 2.1%.
      • The high prevalence was associated with intranasal cocaine and heroin use.
      • Radiologists should report septal perforation so patients can be referred for appropriate treatment.

      Abstract

      Objective

      To determine the prevalence of nasal septal perforation (NSP) on CT imaging in an urban hospital setting.

      Methods

      Facial bone CT scans from 3708 consecutive patients were reviewed for the presence of NSP. Size of the perforation was measured in two dimensions. Medical records were reviewed for possible risk factors.

      Results

      The prevalence of NSP was 2.05%. The most common risk factor was a history of drug abuse. Cocaine was the most prevalent drug used.

      Conclusion

      The prevalence of NSP was more than double of that previously published, likely related to intranasal drug use in our urban population.

      Keywords

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