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Prevalence of shoulder enchondromas on routine MR imaging

  • Edmund D. Hong
    Affiliations
    School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
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  • John A. Carrino
    Affiliations
    The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA

    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
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  • Kristy L. Weber
    Affiliations
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
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  • Laura M. Fayad
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, 601 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. Tel.: +1 410 955 6500; fax: +1 410 502 6454.
    Affiliations
    The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA

    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    Search for articles by this author
Published:December 09, 2010DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinimag.2010.10.012

      Abstract

      The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of incidental shoulder enchondromas on routine magnetic resonance (MR) shoulder imaging. Consecutive routine shoulder MR examinations (N=477) performed for suspected internal derangement were reviewed for the presence of incidental enchondromas. Incidental enchondromas were detected on 2.1% of routine MR shoulder examinations, the vast majority abutting the physeal plate. This prevalence is important to appreciate, in order to form a meaningful differential diagnosis of pathologic proximal humerus lesions.

      Keywords

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