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Computed tomography findings of severe mineralizing microangiopathy in the brain

  • Errol Lewis
    Correspondence
    Address reprint requests to: E. Lewis MD, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas System Cancer Center M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, 6723 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030.
    Affiliations
    Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas System Cancer Center M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Houston, Texas, USA
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  • Ya-Yen Lee
    Affiliations
    Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas System Cancer Center M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Houston, Texas, USA
    Search for articles by this author
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      Abstract

      The intracranial CT findings of mineralizing microangiopathy, a rare condition, are described in seven patients. The underlying pathology was posterior fossa medulloblastoma (four patients), cerebelloastrocytoma (two patients), and acute lymphatic leukemia (one patient). Each of the seven patients was less than 10 years old. Dystrophic calcification was present in the corticomedullary junction, lentiform nucleus of the basal ganglia, corticomedullary junction, and dentate nucleus of the cerebellum. Three of the patients had subtle neurologic signs related to the mineralizing microangiopathy, but none died of central nervous system disease. Although three factors-radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and increased intracranial pressure— probably have a synergistic role in the pathogenesis, radiation is believed the dominant factor. The minimum dose required to induce this damage is 2000 rad.

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