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The excessively small ventricle on cranial computed tomography: Clinical correlation in 75 patients

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Dr. Auh's present address is Yong Ho Auh, M.D., Department of Radiology, The New York Hospital, Cornail University Medical school, New York, New York.
    Yong Ho Auh
    Footnotes
    1 Dr. Auh's present address is Yong Ho Auh, M.D., Department of Radiology, The New York Hospital, Cornail University Medical school, New York, New York.
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiology, Temple University Medical School and Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
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  • Seungho H. Lee
    Correspondence
    Address all correspondence to Seungho H. Lee, M. D., Department of Radiology, State University of New York, Upstate Medical Center, 750 Easi Adams Street, Syracuse, New york 13210.
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiology, Temple University Medical School and Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
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  • Joseph U. Toglia
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurology, Temple University Medical School and Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Dr. Auh's present address is Yong Ho Auh, M.D., Department of Radiology, The New York Hospital, Cornail University Medical school, New York, New York.
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      Abstract

      Excessively small ventricles (ESV) may be seen in a variety of intracranial pathological conditions. Our investigation of 75 cases suggests a relatively high frequency of seizures, headache (especially migraine), subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysms, acute blunt head trauma, and benign intracranial hypertension in patients with ESV. These clinical entities may have cerebral edema and/or increased cerebral blood flow as common denominators, even though they may be secondary to different causes. A prospective critical analysis of this entity, which has long neglected or ignored, perhaps because of its multifaceted and non-specific nature, may be helpful in further understanding its pathophysiology.
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